Home > Book Review, TV Thoughts > Book Review-“The Secret History of Twin Peaks: A Novel” by Mark Frost

Book Review-“The Secret History of Twin Peaks: A Novel” by Mark Frost

Secret History of Twin PeaksOne of the great things about David Lynch and Mark Frost’s “Twin Peaks” is that it’s a mystery that gives you enough clues to formulate your own ideas about what’s going on, but it never definitively answers the main seemingly supernatural enigmas plaguing the fictional town they’ve created. So when you watch the series there’s this fun and fantastic feeling of mysterious dread; like something sinister is out there waiting in the woods of Ghost Wood Forest and you can almost make it out. I’m happy to report that feeling was a big part of Frost’s novel “The Secret History of Twin Peaks.” It provides plenty of new and fun ways of looking at things that can serve as clues and context for watching old episodes of “Twin Peaks” or Showtime’s current “Twin Peaks: The Return,” but it also raises just as many questions as it answers.

“The Secret of History of Twin Peaks” may not be for every fan. If you’re not looking for clues or have no interest in a novel that’s just as much about the strange real history of America and the world as it is about the events in Twin Peaks this probably isn’t for you. Also if you’re looking specifically for a book that is only about the central characters of Twin Peaks (many of them are here and play a large part) or fills in the 25 year gap between the original series and the current Showtime revival (I believe that comes later this year in the form of Frost’s “Twin Peaks: The Final Dossier”) this isn’t for you. If you though are looking to see how things like the Black Lodge and Owl Cave rings impact real world historical figures or have your memory refreshed on important details relevant to the current series this is definitely a book you’ll have fun with. You’ll smile as connection are made and context is given to current events in the Showtime series.

In “The Secret History of Twin Peaks” Frost weaves together connections between the titular town and its residents and weird and very real moments in American and world history. The end result is a novel that feels like Twin Peaks meets Robert Anton Wilson’s “Illuminatus” trilogy or the historical fantasy novels of Tim Powers. I want to get more specific and talk about what’s in there, but I really don’t want to spoil any surprises. Let’s just say if you’re familiar with some of the strange events of American history or conspiracy theories you’ll come across some recognizable faces in the book. If you’re not up on those details google some of the names. You’ll discover some very real and fascinating characters and events.

Those wide historical details will certainly appeal to fans of weird history like myself.Mark-Frost Some passages may feel like they belong in an “X-Files” book, and if that bothers you or feels long I’d advise just be patient and enjoy the ride. Frost takes you to an interesting destination. Also I think it’s safe to say there’s a huge crossover between “Twin Peaks” and “X-Files” fans. Both are weird mysteries where charismatic and eccentric FBI agents play central roles.

The citizens of Twin Peaks aren’t short shifted in Frost’s book either. Some characters play central roles throughout the entire novel. Plus there’s several chapters that deal with the often sordid dealings and machinations of the town’s central figures and families.

Another fun aspect of the “The Secret History” is Frost’s use of the Epistolary method to tell his story. The book is a collection of files, essays, journal entries, and other documents from a variety of authors. There are two central narrators. Agent Tamara Pierce (who is a minor character in the Showtime series) provides fun annotations on the documents presented in the book. It’s especially cool to see her thoughts when weird events are discussed. Much of the narration and documents though come from a mysterious figure named the Archivist. Deducing his identity was a central goal of Pierce and will be the reader’s goal as well. It’s a mystery that’s answered and as a long time “Twin Peaks” fan I thought the answer was highly satisfying.

So if you’re looking for a book that deepens an enriches the mysteries of Twin Peaks by weaving them into the mysteries of America history “The Secret History of Twin Peaks” is definitely a novel you need to pick up. It’s a fun and highly satisfying read that has only increased my excitement and enthusiasm for the new Showtime series. I’m also very excited to read Frost’s follow up book “Twin Peaks: The Final Dossier,” which is currently scheduled to hit on Halloween of this year.

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Categories: Book Review, TV Thoughts
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