Home > 40 K & Horus Heresy, Book Review > Book Review- “Throneworld” by Guy Haley

Book Review- “Throneworld” by Guy Haley

ThroneworldWhen Games Workshop/Black Library announced last year’s long “Warhammer 40,000” event story line, “The Beast Arises,” I was pretty skeptical. I wasn’t exactly sure how a 12 part novel series about a massive invasion by the Orks (a faction that I find interesting in a force of nature sort of way, but never really as compelling villains) could maintain momentum and my interest. The kick off novel to the series though, “I Am Slaughter,” was by Dan Abnett, one of my favorite 40K and comic writers. So I decided to give “The Beast Arises” series a shot.

I Am Slaughter” was pretty good, but I was kind of underwhelmed by book two, and book three had some interesting parts. Then something surprising happened with book four, “The Last Wall.” I suddenly found myself won over and invested in the conflicts and characters of “The Beast Arises” event. I’m happy to report that my enthusiasm has only grown after reading book five, “Throneworld,” by Guy Haley.

I was prepared not to like “Throneworld” because it’s cover featured a member of another 40K faction I find pretty underwhelming, The Eldar. 40K’s space elves do play sort of a large role in the opening chapters of “Throneworld,” but they are not a huge part of the novel. Haley handled them well too. It was interesting seeing them running wild on the Imperium of Man’s home turf of Terra, and their interactions with one of the series main character’s Drakan Vangorich, the Grandmaster of the Imperium’s office of assassins, were pretty interesting. Plus those interactions set the stage for some other compelling dynamics that could be explored in the series second half.

One faction that does play a decent sized role in “Throneworld” that Haley does a pretty fantastic job with is the Adpetus Mechanicus, the Machine Cult of Mars. I used to have zero interest in the Mechanicum. I thought they were one of the most boring factions in the world of 40K. Then I read Graham McNeil’s “Horus Heresy” novel, “Mechanicum” and realized how interesting they could be, and in “Throneworld” Haley further illustrated why Mars is one of the most intriguing worlds in 40K. Quite a bit of the action in the novel involves mystery and intrigue on the Mechanicum homeworld as an ambitious and power hungry Fabricator General advances a secret plan that might lead to victory over the Orks and civil war against the Imperium. Standing in his way are several of Vangorich’s agents.

The rest of the action in “Throneworld” involves 40k’s most ubiquitous faction, the Guy HaleyImperium’s Space Marines, which is fine because Haley utilizes them in fun and fascinating ways. Space Marine stories need action and there’s plenty of really cool, intense, and apocalyptic set pieces in “Throneworld,” but like any good stories the best Space Marine tales are ones that feature strong, vibrant, fully realized characters. There are plenty of those types of Space Marines in “Throneworld.”

The most fascinating of course is Koorland AKA Slaughter, the last surviving member of the Imperial Fists. Watching him rise from the tragedy that cost him his Battle Brothers and grow and change from a front line soldier into a cunning galactic hero and leader has been one of the most satisfying parts so far of “The Beast Arises.”

In “Throneworld” you get to see Koorland kick-ass and continue to grow as he leads “The Last Wall,” an army of different Space Marine legions descended from the Imperial Fists, into battle against an Ork Attack Moon (I’ll never get tired of typing the words Attack Moon! So cool and imaginative!) and deals with the treachery and machinations of the people in charge of the very world he’s trying to defend, The Lords of Terra.

My favorite parts of “Throneworld” though had to deal with some Space Marines new to the larger action of “The Beast Arises,” the Imperium aligned warriors of the fanatical Black Templars legion and the Traitor Legion known as the Iron Warriors. Part of the reasons I find Space Marine Legions so fascinating is each Legion has it’s own cultures and customs. I have not read much about the Black Templars and in “Throneworld” Haley shows off their best and worst traits. The Iron Warriors are allowed to be equally nuanced as well. You don’t forget they betrayed humanity and the Emperor, but their main representative in the book is allowed to be both articulate in his reasons and charismatic.

Kalkator, the Iron Warriors, leader is a fun and interesting character. So is Magneric, the relentless Black Templar High Marshall and cybernetic Dreadnought that is leading a force to hunt down and destroy Kalkator and his grand company of Iron Warriors. Their scenes together are fascinating because of their dynamic as both hunter and hunted and former friends. Plus you get to see what happens to that dynamic when it’s confronted by the savage monstrosity of the Orks. I hope to see more of Kalkator, Magneric, and their respective Legions in future installments of “The Beast Arises.”

So with “Throneworld” my investment and excitement over “The Beast Arises” series has grown. I look forward to reading the next entry in the series, and more books by Guy Haley. I believe this is my first book I’ve read of his and I can’t wait to read his return to “The Beast Arises” with “The Beheading” (The final book in the series) and “Dark Imperium,” which moves the timeline of 40K forward in some directions that sound exciting.

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